cheap jerseys Intervention | Best Addiction Services

Intervention

You have a friend or family member who is slowly destroying himself with drugs or alcohol. It has reached the point that if something isn’t done immediately you’re afraid you’ll soon be attending your friend’s funeral. Whether it’s drugs, alcohol, or any other destructive addiction that can have potentially fatal results if left unchecked, sometimes an intervention is necessary to save an individual’s life. The word ‘intervention’ can bring great discomfort, not only to those who are suffering from an addiction, but for those who feel the need to intervene. It’s estimated that approximately 25 million people over the age of 12 in the United States need help for drug or alcohol problems. Nearly 8 million Americans suffer from eating disorders. The following guide provides the steps to take and the information necessary to stage a successful intervention.

Gather Family and Friends

If you’ve been impacted by your friend’s addiction to the point that you’re considering staging an intervention, it’s likely that others have been affected as well. According to Intercept Interventions, more than half of adult Americans have a family member who has suffered from alcoholism. Add to this number those who have family members who have suffered through food, gambling, and drug addictions as well, would mean the majority of Americans probably have some understanding of what it’s like to live with someone who suffers from addiction. Contact the individual’s family members and close friends to discuss the situation. Once several other people have been contacted, everyone needs to get together as a group. Each person in the intervention needs to be committed to the recovery of their loved one. Every person also needs to discuss how the individual’s addiction has impacted their lives and if they have enabled the person’s addiction in any way. Addictions that may warrant holding an intervention include prescription or street drug abuse, alcoholism, gambling problems, or eating disorders. It’s usually best to include 3 to 5 people in an intervention. Children should not be included.

Prepare and Practice

Since everyone conducting the intervention needs to be in agreement about basic things regarding the addicted individual, preparing ahead of time for the intervention is crucial. What is the purpose of the intervention? What is the hopeful outcome? Will the members of the intervention choose to walk away if the addict refuses treatment? Everyone who is part of the intervention should be in agreement regarding these questions or the intervention will be chaotic and unproductive. The group needs to decide if there will be a leader who will do most of the talking or will each person in the intervention take turns with equal time? Before deciding the details of the intervention, research should be done regarding the individual’s addiction and the treatment options that are available.

Decide the Details of the Intervention

Once those who are going to participate in the intervention have had a chance to discuss the problem and prepare for the intervention, specifics need to be decided. Everyone needs to decide on the best time and place to conduct the intervention. The desired treatment option should be decided upon before the intervention. Be prepared for your loved one to be unresponsive, even cruel and defiant. Those in the intervention must be able to handle the difficult behavior and accusations from the loved one without reacting in a negative way. Considering that nearly 25 percent of all deaths in the United States can be attributed in some manner to addiction makes it imperative that the intervention take place as quickly as possible.

Carry Out the Intervention

While those carrying out the intervention should never be cruel or mean spirited toward the person suffering from the addiction, they do need to be honest. If the person’s addiction has caused a member of the intervention group pain or other difficulties, this needs to be stated. An intervention should include three basic things. Examples of the destructive behaviors the individual has engaged in and how these behaviors have affected those at the intervention should be brought up. Statements should begin with “I” and primarily describe how the individual’s behavior is affecting each person and how they feel about it. “You” and “you’re” should be avoided when talking to the individual. These types of statements may seem overwhelming and intimidating. The goal of the intervention should be stated plainly, describing the specific treatment plan that those conducting the intervention hope the individual will pursue. Finally, what each person in the intervention will do if the individual refuses treatment should be clearly stated.

Follow Through

Those holding the intervention should be prepared for the individual to refuse treatment. If this happens, those in the intervention must be prepared to follow through with the consequences they have given the individual. If the individual refuses treatment and is possibly a threat to himself or others, contacting authorities or other professionals may unfortunately be a last resort.

Even if the individual agrees to rehab, he or she may decide not to go after the intensity of the intervention is over. The person may insist on taking care of the situation himself or may put off treatment until a later date. Those who were involved in the intervention need to remain united and firm, and insist the person seek inpatient treatment immediately.
Inpatient treatment will provide the individual with around the clock supervision and medical care. This type of treatment can be individualized and provide as much individual or group therapy as the person needs. Inpatient therapy also provides a great amount of structure so the individual can focus solely on recovery without worrying about daily chores such as cooking and housekeeping. Finally, from a statistical standpoint, those who commit to more than 30 days at an inpatient facility have higher rates of success and less chance of relapse.

Intervention

You have a friend or family member who is slowly destroying himself with drugs or alcohol. It has reached the point that if something isn’t done immediately you’re afraid you’ll soon be attending your friend’s funeral. Whether it’s drugs, alcohol, or any other destructive addiction that can have potentially fatal results if left unchecked, sometimes an intervention is necessary to save an individual’s life. The word intervention can bring great discomfort, not only to those who are suffering from an addiction, but for those who feel the need to intervene. It’s estimated that approximately 25 million people over the age of 12 in the United States needs help for drug or alcohol problems. Nearly 8 million Americans suffer from eating disorders. The following guide provides the steps to take and the information necessary to stage a successful intervention.

Gather Family and Friends

If you’ve been impacted by your friend’s addiction to the point that you’re considering staging an intervention, it’s likely that others have been affected as well. According to Intercept Interventions, more than half of adult Americans have a family member who has suffered from alcoholism. Add to this number those who have family members who have suffered through food, gambling, and drug addictions as well, would mean the majority of Americans probably have some understanding of what it’s like to live with someone who suffers from addiction. Contact the individual’s family members and close friends to discuss the situation. Once several other people have been contacted, everyone needs to get together as a group. Each person in the intervention needs to be committed to the recovery of their loved one. Every person also needs to discuss how the individual’s addiction has impacted their lives and if they have enabled the person’s addiction in any way. Addictions that may warrant holding an intervention include prescription or street drug abuse, alcoholism, gambling problems, or eating disorders. It’s usually best to include 3 to 5 people in an intervention. Children should not be included.

Prepare and Practice

Since everyone conducting the intervention needs to be in agreement about basic things regarding the addicted individual, preparing ahead of time for the intervention is crucial. What is the purpose of the intervention? What is the hopeful outcome? Will the members of the intervention choose to walk away if the addict refuses treatment? Everyone who is part of the intervention should be in agreement regarding these questions or the intervention will be chaotic and unproductive. The group needs to decide if there will be a leader who will do most of the talking or will each person in the intervention take turns with equal time? Before deciding the details of the intervention, research should be done regarding the individual’s addiction and the treatment options that are available.

Decide the Details of the Intervention

Once those who are going to participate in the intervention have had a chance to discuss the problem and prepare for the intervention, specifics need to be decided. Everyone needs to decide on the best time and place to conduct the intervention. The desired treatment option should be decided upon before the intervention. Be prepared for your loved one to be unresponsive, even cruel and defiant. Those in the intervention must be able to handle the difficult behavior and accusations from the loved one without reacting in a negative way. Considering that nearly 25 percent of all deaths in the United Sates can be attributed in some manner to addiction makes it imperative that the intervention take place as quickly as possible.

Carry Out the Intervention

While those carrying out the intervention should never be cruel or mean spirited toward the person suffering from the addiction, they do need to be honest. If the person’s addiction has caused a member of the intervention group pain or other difficulties, this needs to be stated. An intervention should include three basic things. Examples of the destructive behaviors the individual has engaged in and how these behaviors have affected those at the intervention should be brought up. Statements should begin with “I” and primarily describe how the individual’s behavior is affecting each person and how they feel about it. “You” and “you’re” should be avoided when talking to the individual. These types of statements may seem overwhelming and intimidating. The goal of the intervention should be stated plainly, describing the specific treatment plan that those conducting the intervention hope the individual will pursue. Finally, what each person in the intervention will do if the individual refuses treatment should be clearly stated.

Follow Through

Those holding the intervention should be prepared for the individual to refuse treatment. If this happens, those in the intervention must be prepared to follow through with the consequences they have given the individual. If the individual refuses treatment and is possibly a threat to himself or others, contacting authorities or other professionals may unfortunately be a last resort.

Even if the individual agrees to rehab, he or she may decide not to go after the intensity of the intervention is over. The person may insist on taking care of the situation himself or may put off treatment until a later date. Those who were involved in the intervention need to remain united and firm, and insist the person seek inpatient treatment immediately. Inpatient treatment will provide the individual with around the clock supervision and medical care. This type of treatment can be individualized and provide as much individual or group therapy as the person needs. Inpatient therapy also provides a great amount of structure so the individual can focus solely on recovery without worrying about daily chores such as cooking and housekeeping. Finally, from a statistical standpoint, those who commit to more than 30 days at an inpatient facility have higher rates of success and less chance of relapse.

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